Music Program Concerts and Events

Events

Music Program Concerts and Events

The UCCS Music Program presents over 30 dynamic events each season: concerts, guest artists, masterclasses and workshops. The First Fridays Seminar is a monthly forum dedicated to building an engaged culture of lifelong musicianship through the presentation of research, performance and pedagogical practice by visiting artists, faculty and students.  Student recitals showcase the musical breadth and interdisciplinary depth of our program. And the Peak FreQuency series presents work by our award-winning faculty as well as invited guests from the international music world. Our events are open to all students and community members of the Pikes Peak region - come join us!
 

TICKETING INFO

First Fridays
Free and open to the public.

Student Recitals
UCCS students receive free admission. Contact the Ent Center Box Office at tickets@uccs.edu or 719-255-8181 to receive your complimentary ticket. General admission is $7. Seniors and military are $5. Visit the Ent Center for the Arts ticketing page to purchase tickets.

Student Ensembles
UCCS students receive free admission. Contact the Ent Center Box Office at tickets@uccs.edu or 719-255-8181 to receive your complimentary ticket. General admission is $7. Seniors and military are $5. Visit the Ent Center for the Arts ticketing page to purchase tickets.

Peak FreQuency Concerts
UCCS students receive free admission. Contact the Ent Center Box Office at tickets@uccs.edu or 719-255-8181 to receive your complimentary ticket. General admission is $10. Seniors and military are $8. Visit the Ent Center for the Arts ticketing page to purchase tickets.

Lectures and Masterclasses
Free and open to the public.

 

First Fridays


First Fridays: What’s Your Harmony? - Personal Ethics and Music with Dr. Colin McAllister
October 1, 2021 
Chapman Foundations Recital Hall
12:15pm-1:15pm
Colin McAllister (Assistant Professor, Visual and Performing Arts/Music), a UCCS Daniels Fund Ethics Initiative 2021-22 Fellow, will discuss building a personal code of ethics, and how this might affect the way you make music.


First Fridays: Steph Richards
November 5, 2021 
Chapman Foundations Recital Hall
12:15pm-1:15pm


First Fridays: ghOstMiSt and Reflexive Improvisation - An Afternoon Conversation with Putu Hiranmayena
December 3, 2021 
Chapman Foundations Recital Hall
12:15pm-1:15pm
Putu Hiranmayena is an Indonesian artist-scholar focusing on Indigeneity, Cosmology, and Environmentalism in Balinese Performing Arts.

Recitals and Concerts


Peak FreQuency Presents: Parsing Infinity - Music of Philip Blackburn
Friday, September 10, 2021
Chapman Foundations Recital Hall
7:30pm – 8:30pm
The UCCS Music Program welcomes visiting composer Philip Blackburn who will be working with composition and performance students as well as present a concert of his music. 


Peak FreQuency Presents: Sending, Receiving, Becoming
Friday, October 8, 2021
Chapman Foundations Recital Hall
7:30pm – 8:30pm
UCCS Music Program welcomes Composer and music technologist Scott Miller, professor of music at St. Cloud State University and Pat O’Keefe, clarinetist with the renowned group Zeitgeist along with music faculty flutist Jane Rigler, and trumpeter, Glen Whitehead. Sending, Receiving, Becoming: a blending of relational graphic, video and other visual scores and sonic blueprints, each player sends sound signals to the players who then respond with regenerated sonic transformations, creating a hybridized culture of living sonic expression. With this interactive concept, the essence of the quartet is retained while collaboratively sound-designing a musical eco-system that lives within a flux of sending, receiving and becoming.


Peak FreQuency Presents: Composers-in-Residence Derek Keller, Lukas Schulze, Will Brobston, and Guitarist Russ Callison
Saturday, October 9, 2021
Chapman Foundations Recital Hall
7:30pm-8:30pm
The UCCS Music Program welcomes Visiting Composers-in-Residence Lukas Schulze and Derek Keller for masterclasses with students, composition presentations, and a concluding concert.  Brobston featuring UCCS Music Faculty guitarist Colin McAllister, trumpeter Glen Whitehead, percussionist Randy Bowen and guest guitarist Russ Callison. World premieres include Schulze’s WorRacines for two guitarists and tenor voice [2019] and Brobston’s Bardo [2018] for solo guitar performed by Callison.


Peak FreQuency Presents: Steph Richards Players
Friday, November 5, 2021
Shockley-Zalabak Theater
7:30pm-8:30pm
Composer and trumpet artist Steph Richards visits the UCCS Music Program to work with students and faculty. This concert features faculty members including trumpeter Glen Whitehead, tubist Jon Forshee, vocalist Haleh Abghari as well as the student ensemble, Instrumental and Vocal Laboratory, directed by Haleh Abghari. Also featured on this concert will be the rarely performed Brass Quintet by composer Anthony Davis who won the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for his opera “The Central Park Five.” 


Senior Recital: Dylan Osgood
Sunday, November 7, 2021
Chapman Foundations Recital Hall
7:30pm-8:30pm


Junior Recital: Annelise Soller and Natalie Jensen, voice
Friday, November 12, 2021
Chapman Foundations Recital Hall
7:30pm-8:30pm


Peak FreQuency Presents: SonLingua Ensemble - Fertile Words
Saturday, November 13, 2021
Chapman Foundations Recital Hall
7:30pm – 8:30pm 
This program marks the debut of the Colorado Springs-based SonLingua Ensemble (Jane Rigler, flutes; Colin McAllister, guitar; Haleh Abghari, voice; Andrés Carrizo, (piano and composition) and its collaborative work with Indigenous American poets writing in their native languages. The ensemble will premiere three new movements composed by Carrizo for the ensemble, whose texts consist of poems written by poets Mikeas Sánchez (Chiapas, Mexico) and Sabino Esteban (Guatemala). The program will also include works by György Kurtág, George Benjamin, Iddo Aharony (Assistant Professor of Composition, Colorado College), Stuart Saunders Smith, and Navajo Nation member, Sound Artist/composer Raven Chacon.


Jazz Ensemble
Tuesday, November 16, 2021
Shockley-Zalabak Theater
7:30pm – 8:30pm


University Choir: Solveig Olsen, director
Wednesday, November 17, 2021
Shockley-Zalabak Theater
7:30pm – 8:30pm


Symphony 21: UCCS Symphony Orchestra
Glen Whitehead, director

Saturday, November 20, 2021
Shockley-Zalabak Theater
7:30pm – 8:30pm


Junior Recital: Chayanne Rodriguez Trinidad, voice; Jeremy Arellano Ortiz, sound design/composition
Wednesday, December 1, 2021
Chapman Foundations Recital Hall
7:30pm – 8:30pm


Chamber Music Ensemble: Martha Muehleisen, director
Thursday, December 2, 2021
Chapman Foundations Recital Hall
7:30pm – 8:30pm


Vocal & Instrumental Lab & the Student Composers Seminar concerts (Haleh Abghari and Jon Forshee, directors)
Friday, December 3, 2021
Chapman Foundations Recital Hall
7:30pm – 8:30pm


Brass Quintet: John Forshee, director
Sunday, December 5, 2021
Chapman Foundations Recital Hall
7:30pm – 8:30pm


Senior Recital: Jenna Hinkle, cello
Friday, December 10, 2021
Chapman Foundations Recital Hall
7:30pm – 8:30pm

Lectures and Masterclasses


The Third Friday Colloquia: Essays in Music, curated by Colin McAllister in the Department of Visual and Performing Arts, showcase scholarship in the best sense, highlighting the power and range of human inquiry and creativity. Four times yearly, on Friday afternoons at the UCCS Downtown Center, UCCS faculty and select guests present creative work and research trajectories. Presentations begin at 4pm and last approximately 45 minutes, followed by discussion. 
 
All events are hybrid, with the option to participate in-person, or virtually. The UCCS Downtown Center is located at 102 S. Tejon St., suite 105-a, Colorado Springs, CO 80903.


January 21, 2022
Apocalyptic Themes in the Music of Olivier Messiaen
(Andrew Shenton, Boston University)
Free and open to all via Zoom meeting (see link below)

This lecture examines aspects of the Catholic apocalypse as presented through the highly personal musical style of Olivier Messiaen (1908-92). A chronological survey of those works that explicitly deal with his personal eschatology demonstrate that Messiaen’s understanding of the apocalypse is revelation rather than Armageddon. Throughout his oeuvre he returned to several major theological themes (including the angels of the apocalypse and the abyss), but concentrated on musical depictions of heaven and the celestial city in his attempt to describe the ineffable in music. Concentrating especially on the Quatuor pour la fin du temps, a case is made for a highly individual eschatology that transcends institutional religious boundaries and is presented in music of enormous power and beauty.

Andrew Shenton is a scholar, prize-winning author, performer, and educator based in Boston, Massachusetts. Born in England, he first studied at The Royal College of Music in London, and holds bachelor, masters and doctoral degrees from London University, Yale, and Harvard respectively. He has been the recipient of numerous scholarships and awards including a Harvard Merit Fellowship, Harvard’s Certificate of Distinction in Teaching, and a Junior Fellowship from the Humanities Center at Boston University. He has given more than eighty premieres by composers such as Geoffrey Burgon, Joe Utterback, John Tavener, Judith Weir, and Arvo Pärt. Moving freely between musicology and ethnomusicology Shenton’s work is best subsumed under the heading ‘music and transcendence,’ and includes several major publications on Messiaen, Pärt, and others. His most recent monograph, Arvo Pärt’s Resonant Texts was published by CUP in 2018. Dr. Shenton is Professor of Music at Boston University, and Conductor of Vox Futura.

Join Zoom Meeting:
uccs-edu.zoom.us/j/96265199123?pwd=ejBBbHlmMmp2bTk4ZjYzT3JxMENWdz09
Meeting ID: 962 6519 9123
Passcode: 898207
 


February 18, 2022
Ich fühle Luft von anderem Planeten: Arnold Schoenberg as Apocalyptic Visionary
(Colin McAllister, UCCS)
Free and open to all via Zoom meeting (see link below)

Arnold Schoenberg (1874-1951) was one of the most influential—and controversial—composers of the early twentieth century. He is perhaps best known for positing music without a tonal center (commonly called ‘atonal’ or ‘non-tonal’ music), and then subsequently devising the ‘twelve-tone’ or ‘dodecaphonic’ system of composition, a method of organizing pitch material in the absence of common-practice, functional tonality. In this presentation, I argue that Schoenberg’s threshold works during his breakthrough move to atonality from late 1907 to 1909 may be properly construed as ‘music in an apocalyptic mode’. I set the stage via an overview of the late Romantic milieu in which Schoenberg developed his art, and briefly examine an early work (Four Songs, Op. 1, No. 1) which inaugurated his musical maturity as a composer. I then discuss the artistic movement of expressionism and Schoenberg’s role as prophetic revelator before concluding with an analysis of his Second String Quartet, Op. 10.

Colin McAllister is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Visual and Performing Arts at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, where he is a 2021-22 Daniels Fund Ethics Initiative Fellow. His performances as a guitarist have been hailed as “sparkling….delivered superbly” (San Francisco Chronicle), “ravishing” (San Diego Union Tribune) and “an amazing tour de force” (San Diego Story), and he has recorded on the Summit, Innova, Centaur, Naxos, Albany, Old King Cole, Vienna Modern Masters, Carrier and Tzadik labels. His research interests include contemporary music performance and pedagogy, musical modernism, and the apocalyptic paradigm as manifested in various phenomena—literature, music, and art. His new book, Dies irae, dies illa: Music in the Apocalyptic Mode, will be published later this year by the Dutch publisher Brill in their Word and Music series.

Join Zoom Meeting:
uccsedu. zoom.us/j/91260013197?pwd=NkVJK0ZKWlpCV0NxZTBhTXhQbVZVUT09
Meeting ID: 912 6001 3197
Passcode: 993587


March 18, 2022
The Music of Homer
(a roundtable discussion with Colin McAllister, composer Adam Greene, and classicists Mary France (UCCS) and Richard Thomas (Harvard University)
Free and open to all via Zoom meeting (see link below)

In just the past thirty years, there have appeared several new translations of both the Iliad and Odyssey. What is so compelling about these two ancient poems, and why does each generation feel the need to render them afresh? This roundtable of musicians and classicists will discuss the music of ancient Greece itself, modern compositions that are influenced by Homer, and a discussion of how differing translations render the music of Homer’s verse.

Adam Greene is a composer and writer whose work references interests in literature, linguistics, and cognitive science in music that explores multiplicity, fragility, and instability, often through intensive examination of instrumental practice. He has received grants and awards from The Fromm Music Foundation at Harvard, ASCAP, NACUSA, The Center for Cultural Innovation (CCI), The American Music Center, and The American Composers Forum. Born in Chicago and raised in New England, he now lives and works in San Diego.

Mary France is a classical language lecturer at UCCS, who not only has a passion for ancient Greek literature, but also has maintained an interest in music.  She was a member of two early music groups while living in Albuquerque, NM, and after moving to Colorado, has attended the Spanish Peaks International Harp Retreat, and performed at Harp Fantasia concerts in Denver.  Recently, she purchased a replica tortoise-shell lyre from Greece. 

Richard F. Thomas, George Martin Lane Professor of the Classics, was born in London and brought up in New Zealand. He was educated at the University of Auckland (B.A. 1972; M.A. 1973), and at the University of Michigan (Ph.D. 1977). He taught at Harvard as Assistant and Associate Professor, 1977–84; as Associate Professor at the University of Cincinnati, 1984–86; as Professor at Cornell University, 1986–87; as Professor of Greek and Latin at Harvard from 1987–2010; as George Martin Lane Professor of the Classics since 2010; he was visiting Professor of Latin, University of Venice (Spring, 1991).

Join Zoom Meeting:
uccsedu. zoom.us/j/98152327348?pwd=M21zMGE2YnFNWFk0bUk2RHZsM01ZQT09
Meeting ID: 981 5232 7348
Passcode: 422373


April 15, 2022
The Music of György Kurtág: Poetry, Literature and Psyche
(Haleh Abghari, UCCS)
Free and open to all via Zoom meeting (see link below)

Join Zoom Meeting:
uccsedu. zoom.us/j/95703184057?pwd=WE04L25KTnVOVXBIaHdoVmFLdW1vZz09
Meeting ID: 957 0318 4057
Passcode: 106469